Regarding Joan Smith’s concern about coyotes in the Oct. 21 Issue of The Pilot, I’d like to call out the honorable work of Joan Smith and her neighbor as they care for cats abandoned by their humans. They remind us that domesticated pets require as much attention as the human members of our family.

Now I’d like to address a broader issue. According to numerous scientists, including Roland Kays, zoologist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, indoor/outdoor cats and their feral (formerly domesticated) relatives kill up to 10 times the amount of native wildlife as wild predators.

David Attenborough in his latest Netflix documentary, “A Life on Our Planet,” says that 96 percent of the biomass on Earth is “humans, livestock and pets.” This means that only 4 percent of all the biomass left on our planet is wild.

So, the coyotes are doing their part at lessening the extra predation pressures on the wildlife we love here in Moore County, including songbirds, rabbits, squirrels and lizards. All these native wild creatures make our home a unique and rich place to live. There is no reason to be alarmist about coyotes. They are part of this awe-inspiring world of wildness and the innumerable benefits it provides us.

Keep your cats indoors at all times and report feral unclaimed cats to Animal Control.

Greta Nintzel

Whispering Pines

Publisher’s Note: This is a letter to the editor, submitted by a reader, and reflects the opinion of the author. The Pilot welcomes letters from readers on its Opinion page, which serves as a public forum. The Pilot is not in the business of suppressing public opinion. We are a forum for community debate, and publish almost every letter we receive. For information on how to make a submission, visit this page: https://www.thepilot.com/site/forms/online_services/letter/

(3) comments

Frank Staples

Coyotes do serve a purpose on this earth but that doesn't stop me from shooting every one I get a clear shot at. They have decimated the small game and deer population on Fort Bragg and other local areas. They are in downtown Southern Pines and are definitely not needed there. Now if they would go to our major cities and eat rats...

Jeff Marcus

Well said, Greta. Thank you for your comments.

Diana Smith

I agree.

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