More Deer in Pinehurst

Deer in the wooded area behind the Village of Pinehurst Police Station.

Pinehurst should reduce the urban deer herd through a “selective” hunting program, according to a village task force’s final report.

That report, which now goes to the Village Council for consideration, says any culling program “should be highly controlled and managed” by the Police Department, “using a selective group of “highly trained archery and/or firearms professionals and after thorough evaluation” of the information compiled by the task force over the nearly three months of work.

The task force has come under increasing pressure recently from animal rights advocates and those who either support the aesthetics of the deer’s presence or who scoff at such a hunting program in a village known more for its golf heritage than its sport shooting history.

That pressure is likely to heighten attention to the council’s discussion of the report. Regardless, task force chairman and council member John Strickland said the deer issue must be addressed.

“From what I have heard these past few months, some selective culling is needed,” he said. “I have come to the conclusion the village needs to manage the herd. I don’t see how the village could avoid considering this.”

The report also calls for a public education program on the use of deer repellents such as Liquid Fence and other measures to ward them off, as well as providing information to residents on the types of deer-resistant plants and flowers to protect landscaping. Another recommendation calls for installing “Deer Crossing” signs in areas where deer-vehicle collisions are more likely, such as along Linden Road.

“It seems to me that this is a reasonable, balanced approach,” Strickland said.

The report will presented to the council at its meeting Tuesday at 4:30 p.m. in the Village Assembly Hall. 

The final report has been posted on the village website:

But Strickland cautioned that it would take some time for the council to study the various options for culling.

“Any culling would be extraordinarily well-planned,” Strickland said.

The Deer Management Task Force, appointed by the council Aug. 12, has met weekly since Sept. 3. It has studied a number of options to help deal with deer-related problems, primarily damage to landscaping as well as the potential for more collisions with vehicles if the animal’s population continues to increase.

The culling recommendation came down to information provided by Rupert Medford, a wildlife biologist with the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. He said the deer density has reached a point in certain areas that culling is warranted.

“He’s tasked with managing wildlife and protecting the health of the herd,” task force member John Eastman said. “It is not just for killing deer. I lean on him.”

Eastman said reducing the size of the herd might have “a positive impact on some of those other things.”

Medford estimated that the density in the area to be 15 to 29 deer per square mile, which is at a level where culling is needed to maintain the health of the herd, the report says. He estimates that there are 300 deer in the village and that 100 could be taken over a period of several years to prevent over-population.

“Rupert Medford has determined that the density is higher than the carrying capacity of the habitat,” said task force member Michael Black, who helped write that portion of the report.

Black, who is a hunter, said he would prefer an urban archery program, which he said has been implemented in 44 municipalities, instead of using professional sharpshooters.

“I don’t think having sharpshooters in Pinehurst is a good idea,” he said.

But some on the task force have expressed concerns about bow hunting, saying the use of firearms would be more humane. Black said an archery program would be less expensive and just as safe.

Strickland said the report will include detailed information on both archery and firearms for the council to consider.

“I think that it will be helpful for the council to have all that information, how it would be heavily controlled. We would not be talking about open hunting season in Pinehurst.”

Task force member Rob Papp, who worked on the insurance liability portion of the report, said the village could face a lower surcharge on its insurance premiums by using licensed professionals as opposed to allowing regular hunters.

As for the likelihood of more deer-vehicle collisions, “anything we can do to avoid losses, we should do,” he said of managing the size of the herd. He added that culling “is certainly a lot more humane than being hit by a car.”

Eastman added that motorists should exercise caution on the roads now since this is the peak of mating season and deer are more active.

Strickland pointed to a village survey done several weeks ago that found a majority of the 1,215 respondents favor a program that includes public education, “common sense” measures residents can take and selective culling. It found many were concerned about damage deer do to landscaping and the potential for more deer-vehicle collisions.

“It’s a fairly good indication of what people are concerned about,” Strickland said. “It is about a scientific as we can get. The public understands some selective reduction in the herd is needed.”

But some who have attended the task force meetings recently have been critical of the way survey questions were worded and how residents were made aware of it. Village resident Peggy Herman, who opposes any deer culling, urged the task force to recommend another survey before the council votes on whether to implement culling. She said the village has a population of 15,000.

“Next time, ask people specifically if they want to do this,” Herman said of culling. “And be up front: Use the word killing. Call it what it is.”

Strickland reiterated that the 1,215 responses was the most the village has received on any survey. He said it would be up to the council to decide whether to conduct another survey.

While the task force concludes that tick-borne illnesses from deer do not pose an immediate public health threat, it agreed that it is important for residents to be aware of it and that the village should regularly remind them of things to do avoid ticks, which members said are also carried by dogs and cats, not just deer.

The task force ruled out recommending a sterilization or contraceptive program or any attempt to trap and relocate deer, mainly because of the associated higher costs. Task force member Melissa Swarbrick said the state would not authorize a sterilization or contraceptive program. She said that is approved only for an area with a “closed population.”

The task force also decided against proposing fencing as a measure to keep deer out of residents’ yards.

Strickland said the village could begin implementing the public education component almost immediately. He said it could take the council several months to weigh whether to implement culling.

“There is still some work to be done,” he said. “These sorts of questions would be left to the village staff and police department and the Wildlife Resources Commission.”

Police Chief Earl Phipps, who was away attending his mother’s funeral, said at last week’s meeting that he personally opposes culling, but that if it was done, he wanted it tightly controlled.

Swarbrick pointed out that Medford has provided estimated numbers to the village showing the need for culling.

“He does not have an agenda,” she said. “He has a job to do. He is a hunter, but he is also an animal lover.”

(48) comments

Mary Whitmire

What is the rationale for the hunt?
How many (if any) complaints were received? Who were the complaints from, and were the complainers residents? What was the specific nature of the complaints?

Were any attempts made to resolve the complaints in a non-lethal manner (ex: such as using repellents or deer-resistant flowers to protect flower beds)?

Does the town have any educational materials on its website outlining what steps residents can take to avert deer damage?

What are the town's deer concerns? Are they substantiated in any way, or just based on generalized concerns or assertions from other places? If data was collected, what kind and who collected it?

If the community is saying there should only be x number of deer per square mile (or overall) what is the basis for that assertion?

How many deer will need to be removed and what is that figure based upon?

Given that most communities are surrounded by deer habitat, it’s likely that deer from the surrounding area will replace any removed. Combined with a probable increase in the reproductive rate , any reduction in deer numbers by hunting will be quickly offset by the immigration of new deer into the area and increased survival of fawns. How will this bounce-back in deer numbers be dealt with, year after year?

Sharp-shooting:

What is the projected cost of sharp-shooting deer? Over a 5 and 10 year period, what will the cumulative cost be for annual deer kills? What will the additional indirect costs be?

What system will be set up so residents can get a quick response to wounded deer on residents’ properties?

What steps will be taken to assure residents’ safety? Will resident activities on the property be curtailed in any way? Does the community have appropriate liability insurance?

The deer population is too high

What is the basis for this assertion? Have any censuses of the local deer population been done and if so, what type of census and who conducted it? Or are general estimates and prescriptions from other places being used instead?

Is the entity which said deer numbers are too high the same entity which would benefit financially from a deer killing program?

Do people realize that deer damage complaints and deer density are not necessarily linear? An increase in damage complaints may just reflect the tempting nature of what landowners are planting in their yards.
Bow-hunting as a solution
Bow hunting is not a quick-kill method. A big part of bow-hunting is following the “blood trail” after wounded deer run off. Will all adjoining landowners be contacted and asked to allow trespass by archers? What if deer run off hunted property onto private land where trespass is not allowed?

Since bow-hunting incurs such a high crippling rate, what system if any will be set up respond to homeowners who see crippled deer? What is the cost to the community of increased law enforcement/ response? Will there be a reporting system set up to respond 24/7?

Bow hunting is not an efficient method of killing deer. How many archers will be needed -- over exactly what area --- to take out how many deer?

Assessment/ Monitoring

How will the result of the hunt be monitored, if at all? Has any baseline data been collected, and if so, what type and who collected it?

Mary Whitmire

These questions MUST be answered:

What is the rationale for the hunt?
How many (if any) complaints were received? Who were the complaints from, and were the complainers residents? What was the specific nature of the complaints?

Were any attempts made to resolve the complaints in a non-lethal manner (ex: such as using repellents or deer-resistant flowers to protect flower beds)?

Does the HOA have any educational materials on its website outlining what steps residents can take to avert deer damage?

What are the HOA’s deer concerns? Are they substantiated in any way, or just based on generalized concerns or assertions from other places? If data was collected, what kind and who collected it?

If the community is saying there should only be x number of deer per square mile (or overall) what is the basis for that assertion?

How many deer will need to be removed and what is that figure based upon?

Given that most communities are surrounded by deer habitat, it’s likely that deer from the surrounding area will replace any removed. Combined with a probable increase in the reproductive rate , any reduction in deer numbers by hunting will be quickly offset by the immigration of new deer into the area and increased survival of fawns. How will this bounce-back in deer numbers be dealt with, year after year?

Sharp-shooting:

What is the projected cost of sharp-shooting deer? Over a 5 and 10 year period, what will the cumulative cost be for annual deer kills? What will the additional indirect costs be?

What system will be set up so residents can get a quick response to wounded deer on residents’ properties?

What steps will be taken to assure residents’ safety? Will resident activities on the property be curtailed in any way? Does the community have appropriate liability insurance?

The deer population is too high

What is the basis for this assertion? Have any censuses of the local deer population been done and if so, what type of census and who conducted it? Or are general estimates and prescriptions from other places being used instead?

Is the entity which said deer numbers are too high the same entity which would benefit financially from a deer killing program?

Do people realize that deer damage complaints and deer density are not necessarily linear? An increase in damage complaints may just reflect the tempting nature of what landowners are planting in their yards.
Bow-hunting as a solution
Bow hunting is not a quick-kill method. A big part of bow-hunting is following the “blood trail” after wounded deer run off. Will all adjoining landowners be contacted and asked to allow trespass by archers? What if deer run off hunted property onto private land where trespass is not allowed?

Since bow-hunting incurs such a high crippling rate, what system if any will be set up respond to homeowners who see crippled deer? What is the cost to the community of increased law enforcement/ response? Will there be a reporting system set up to respond 24/7?

Bow hunting is not an efficient method of killing deer. How many archers will be needed -- over exactly what area --- to take out how many deer?

Assessment/ Monitoring

How will the result of the hunt be monitored, if at all? Has any baseline data been collected, and if so, what type and who collected it?

Mary Whitmire

Issues with Bow-Hunting
Written by Laura Simon
Wildlife Ecologist, Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)
July 2014
One of the main problems with trying to manage deer through lethal means-- as repeatedly cited during a Smithsonian Institute conference on Deer Overabundance (McShea et. al 1997) -- is that deer are highly prolific, and their high reproductive rate can quickly compensate for declines in their population.
Deer exhibit higher productivity (i.e. more twins and triplets are born, higher survival rates and earlier onset of sexual maturity) when there are fewer deer and more food is available. In other words, they “bounce back.” This is why removal can have an oscillating effect, as demonstrated on Angel Island in California, where biannual removals over a 5 year period of 215 to 25 deer resulted in high rebound to 250 deer.
Any lethal control program must not only significantly reduce the deer herd but also sustain enough pressure to keep the population at a low level and prevent this bounce-back, AND prevent deer from the surrounding area from wandering in --- all of which usually poses an insurmountable challenge especially in urban/suburban areas.
Dozens of studies show unacceptably high-crippling rates even when the most modern bow-hunting methods are used (Gregory 2005, Nixon et. al 2001, Moen 1989, Cada 1988, Boydston and Gore 1987, Langenau 1986, Gladfelter 1983, Stormer et. al, 1979, Downing 1971, etc ).
In other words, on average, for every deer struck by an arrow, another may be crippled but not killed. Archers may be good at hitting a stationary target but judgment, distance estimation, and
adrenaline all come into play and influence whether or not a hunter attempts a “good shot” or one that may pose risk of injury to the deer.
Bow-hunting is, by its very nature, not considered an instant kill method (unless the arrow penetrates a vital organ like the heart, which is uncommon). When deer are struck by an arrow, it triggers a flee response. A big part of bow-hunting is following the blood trail and finding the deer before they succumb to injury, blood loss, shock, and other secondary complications, which may take hours, or even days.
Bow-hunting is also one of the more inefficient forms of hunting, in terms of the time and effort required for the number of deer taken. For example, in a frequently cited and published case of deer reduction by bow-hunting, it took 66 hunters a total of 371 outings to kill 22 deer on a 53 acre site (Kilpatrick and Walter, 1999).
The bottom line is that trying to keep deer at a certain low level can be an expensive and futile battle, and bow-hunting is one of the most inhumane and inefficient ways to attempt this.
One of the most important tasks in designing a wildlife conflict mitigation plan is to a) collect and compile data to indicate the magnitude and scope of the problem(s) b) clearly define what the problems are, and c) set clear, achievable and measurable goals and a way to achieve them and d) create an ongoing monitoring program to assess the program’s progress and level of goal achievement.
Hunting is often proposed by most communities as the best way to manage deer problems. However, in most communities, valid baseline data are not collected, clear measurable goals and performance indicators aren’t set, and a monitoring system is not put in place. The result is that the hunt is measured by anecdotal observation which in itself is affected by people’s pre-conceived attitudes and expectations.
The community would be wise to spend its funds assessing exactly what the deer conflicts are, (scope and location) so that site-specific solutions can be applied. Arbitrarily killing some deer won’t reduce the population for long and won’t resolve conflicts. There are better and more humane strategies for resolving deer issues.
CITATIONS:
Boydston, G.A. and Gore, H.G. 1987. Archery Wounding Loss in Texas. Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. Austin, Texas. 16pp.
Cada, J.D., 1988. "Preliminary Archery Survey Report." Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks. Helena, Montana. 7pp.
Downing, R.L. 1971. "Comparison of Crippling Losses of White-tailed Deer Caused by Archery, Buckshot and Shotgun Slugs." Proceedings of the Southeastern Association of Game and Fish Commissioners. 25:77-82.
Gregory, N.G. 2005. Bowhunting deer. Science in the Service of Animal Welfare. Universities Federation for Animal Welfare 2005 (14) 111-116.

Tommy Davis

I have to grin MIke ... The Pilot reports' lean on the kill side of population control as opposed to logical reasoning by the TFC. Deer have a keen sense of smell as you probably know as well.

Should the TFC assault team go forward with their unreasonable plan, perhaps a recovery team should be engaged to collect all of the carcasses laying around in people's yards. Great for family's with small children to see a once vibrant living being lying dead on their front lawn. They can even name them: That's Dancer and Prancer, their lies Dasher, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Dunder (variously spelled Donder and Donner), and Blixem (variously spelled Blitzen and Blixen), Merry Christmas Village of Pinehurst.

Mike McLellan

Now all you have to do is convince the Task Force Commando...Good luck! But thanks for posting that information Toda. I'm always interested in hearing & learning ways that influence nature of all kinds.

Tommy Davis

True Mike there are clusters throughout the Sandhills. However there is a reason for salt licks which most animals love, and the sweet smell of molasses. Horses have eaten a molasses treat for centuries. That mixed with corn and a salt lick is the draw that will bring small clusters together. It works ....

Mike McLellan

I don't know Toda. Sounds like it has some merit to get some deer moving, but there are clusters throughout the area; not just one big herd. That process would have to start with each cluster and then go perfectly right to have any effect IMO. I understand and can accept culling IF it is needed for the benefit of the animal. One such factor would be wanton waste disease; but there is none as natural forage is in plentiful supply. When tick born diseases was brought up it was laughable and just thrown out there to confuse the public. There is no evidence of any such problem other than deer and all animals & birds have ticks or other parasites...to include humans. Why not just cull every species. This is local government gone wild. They have the power and just do such things from time to time...just to demonstrate that they can.

Tommy Davis

Mike they are obviously clueless. Let's think about this so called problem for moment. First there are deer forging for food. That's what wild animals do ... that's how they survive - looking for something to eat.

Like cattle they survive to eat but the 64 thousand dollar question is how does one get them to the dinner table to eat. Salt lick is like candy to deer and other wild animals. They love corn ... hunters use it all the time to bait deer on heavily traveled paths.

Find the largest concentration of deer, set out a salt lick in a direction you want the deer to travel ... and corn with molasses. Then every other day move the "table" a hundred yards at a time; they can smell it and follow it. Keep moving until the entire herd is relocated. Now the problem ... once a hunter kills one of the deer they will disband and go in different directions; then you are back to square one. But as long as you can maintain the herd, they will follow the food source until they go where you want.

Mike McLellan

I'd like to hear that Toda. Why not put it in print right here? But it will certainly fall on deaf ears. Have you not read above.... Task force Chairman John Strickland, who is also a council member states... "I have come to the conclusion the village needs to manage the herd.......Period...!" I mean he's not only a member of Task Force; but also a council member! If these so called pro's hit twenty deer with an arrow at night. It will be the village residents mopping up the majority of the carnage the next day. Dead or dying deer thrashing in the pansies; which got them into this predicament. How many children or adults for that matter have seen large animal's gasping and struggling for another breath of air?

Linda Konold

Toda...please do! Tell the mayor and the task force your theory. How can we all get behind you to stop this insanity!

Tommy Davis

I remember well before the Diamond-head express: 2 days and 3 nights that began the migration of out-of-towners. Wildlife flourished and was plentiful. Just like Native Americans, wildlife was moved from there natural environment and habitats. Villagers are now saying to deer herds, you must die because we took your habitat and you are an annoyance. You must be killed for trying to forge for life sustaining nourishment.

The educated ignorance appears to be viable and alive in the kingdom. I propose moving the herds without any killing. Can it be done. Absolutely! However a moratorium will have yo be imposed in certain areas around Pinehurst. I will be glad to explain my theory on how to relocate herds of animals.

Mary Whitmire

Please come to the meeting Toda on December 9th. Come early and sign in to speak!

Barbara Brady

I sincerely hope and pray no one is injured by a stray bullet or arrow. It was not my intent to imply that. I do think the liability would be greater for the village if this were to happen.

roobidy

Gotta love it. The same rich people that live in their gated communities with a million different rules and regulations are the same people rich people that vote for no rules or regulations at the federal level so that they can continue to steal from the working classes. Go back to where you came from. Stop ruining this beautiful area.

Mike McLellan

With the intellect displayed by this task force; why not bring in some more coyotes..or maybe wolves to take care of the deer. Allow the 25 - 45 pound pet snatching predators to hunt in our backyards, but "Have Concern" for folks losing a few flowers to some deer. There was no process of thought or actual debate to discuss any of this. The decision was made months ago, but this charade in the media was necessary to appease us village idiots. Government ruled by percieved elitists knowing what is best for us; and by God we're going to get it and eventually thank you for your great wisdom.

The whole thing is an embarrassment to the community.

Sean Evans

Ugh. I can't believe they'd consider archery here. Just wait until the first deer goes running through the community with an arrow sticking out of it. Look at how many deer are wounded in archery hunts. Seriously way less humane than other things. Why not sterilization ?? Other places with open populations are trying it and we don't even have that many deer. Most places are trying to get below 30 deer per square mile.

Barbara Brady

If the council is concerned now over their liability from a deer causing an automobile accident wait until one of their hired guns shoots and injures or kills a human being and see what happens.

Chris Williams

Exactly blessherheartagain! That whole mess actually made news on CNN and some major websites when it happened. So sad. That spirit is still alive and well in the council, no doubt.

Bridget Gulka

Much like making an ordinance for noise after some neighbors did not like kids playing basketball after 8 at night

Tommy Davis

Simple solution to the problem and not one deer will have to die. Have the mayor give me a call and I'll explain natural migration theory to her. The Pilot knows how to reach me....

Chris Williams

LBK, sadly the golden rule of Pinehurst politics is that your opinion does not matter. All it takes is the "right" person to complain or suggest a change and the council moves ahead with it. The "right" person is a council member or the mayor, or any of the wealthier citizens that have loads of time and nothing to do other than complain about something the majority of the population could care less about or does not want changed. Notice that you never see this kind of thing happening in the other towns in the county (other than Whispering Pines, for the same reasons)???
The Village could spend the money and time on improvements but they have no interest in that especially if those improvements are for the younger or non-millionaire populace. They are stuck in the mindset that all of us are retired, and very wealthy, and wish to live in one big gated, sheltered community with a million draconian ordinances and petty rules designed to keep Pinehurst as regulated and "picture perfect" according to their standards.

Linda Konold

It appears to me that an overwhelming majority are AGAINST killing the deer. Why isn't there a vote on this? What is happening to the wonderful place I moved to 25 years ago?!? Is there a petition that we can sign or get started?

When are we getting a Taskforce for the next offenders? Who will bow hunt and cull the bunnies, squirrels, and gopher terrorizing my overpriced garden which I view as an extension of my own worth and wonder. These animals are making this a personal affront to my freedom to Lillies... I mean Liberty.

When will fog trucks come through the neighborhood to cull the bugs that munch leaves in my garden?

Commander Black who will safeguard us from these terrors of nature while my neighbor loses another dog to coyote attacks?

Backyard Bunny Bow Hunters when?

roobidy

Wow. Amazing. Now they're actually going to kill off what little "small town charm" remains one deer at a time. What an ugly and utterly generic little community that Pinehurst is becoming: nothing more than a playground for the overly wealthy to sit around and suck up all the water for their golf courses in our drought-ridden area. I always wondered why those rich people move here. They don't want to be a part of the community. They don't even like the community that was here long before they showed up. They shut themselves off in their gated neighborhoods, and then design rules that the rest of the hard-working native Pinehurst residents have to live by. Hey, I've got an idea: build a few more parking lots, chain restaurants, big box stores, and mansions for the rich, and I'm sure you'll wipe out the native population of every living thing that once made Pinehurst beautiful. Thanks for ruining a nice place.

Mary Whitmire

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/deer/tips/deer-humane-control.html?credit=web_id515952023

Chris Williams

Once again a Village Council/Mayor huge waste of time and money. If you don't think that the Mayor and Council had already made up their mind on what they wanted to do you are crazy. All of this basically over the Mayor's daisies getting eaten. They believe that as long as they form a pointless "taskforce" or hire an outside consultant it will justify the predetermined decision they made from moment one. It is sad that our leaders are so petty and self-centered. The Mayor and the Council care about two things, themselves and their wealthy retired buddies who have nothing better to do than waste our money and time over a non-issue. Even more petty to bring to the argument the chance of somebody suing the Village over a deer/car collision, which has NEVER happened in the town's history. They are grasping at straws...
I could care less about the deer to be frank, if they were an issue you can blow them up with C4 if you wanted, what gets me mad is the waste of Village resources, money and time over this pointless non-issue.

Lisa Hagedorn

Disgusting…. Something that should not be a problem to begin with, has been escalated to this ridiculous and sad state of affairs! Please stop this craziness.

Do you know what happens when an arrow hits a deer? Please read a portion of a veterinarian's article about it….
View: Bowhunting deer 'particularly abhorrent' - http://lohud.us/1quPZWE

Of the choices available to Teatown to control their deer numbers, I find the decision to use bow hunters particularly abhorrent.

A deer struck by an arrow fired from a bow will experience pain and suffering. This is true regardless of what part of the deer’s body is penetrated by the arrow. Upon entry the arrow will pierce skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscle and blood vessels. A deer’s chest and abdominal cavities are lined with abundant nerve endings. Only if the arrow penetrates the heart will it bring about immediate death and cessation of the animal’s pain. A deer struck by an arrow experience an immediate adrenaline rush and a flight response. The archer is obligated to track the deer to its final point of collapse. If not dead at that point, then the deer must be killed at close range, presumably with another arrow. This description is something I have observed personally.

Approximately 12 years ago, my wife, young son and I came upon a deer wounded by an arrow at the conclusion of our hike in the springs area of Long Island. The deer had collapsed at the back of a building near the trailhead and an arrow was protruding from the animal’s chest. The animal was struggling for breath and its gums were pale and its eyes were wide with fright. No hunter was in sight and it was not clear how long the deer had been there. The deer was dying and only a quick solution would end its suffering. Local police were summoned and the deer was dispatched with the officer’s revolver.

This is the same as every carpenter with a hammer wants to use it to pound nails, every hunter on the "task force" wants to use their weapon of choice to kill animals. Let the deer eat the pansies.

Mary Whitmire

[smile]

Jim Tomashoff

Forgot the "not" in the first sentence, my bad.

Jim Tomashoff

I'm concerned about shooting and injuring but killing individual deer. Very cruel. So I suggest three Toyota trucks, each mounted with a 50mm machine gun. The idea being one goes directly towards any deer spotted. The other two work a flanking operation. Coordinate with "Operation Deer Cull" command center (located on the Carolina Hotel's roof) using a dedicated visual link with a Global Hawk drone which will be eye-balling the op from 30,000 ft. Yes it is possible that some private property may be mussed up by the trucks as they cannot be limited to just paved roads when the mission "goes hot." But there is no substitute for VICTORY. The Village might also consider issuing "I Support The Cullers," bumper stickers as part of a larger psyops effort to insure popular support during the mission.

Mike McLellan

".....Again I ask Mr. Black of the Commander of the Deadly Deer Killing Taskforce why not tackle a real issue like coyotes, rather than herbivores like deer?...." Good call FrikityFrak

Jim Tomashoff

Just don't begin implementing the cull on "National Dress-Up Like A Deer Day."

Bridget Gulka

Peggy Herman is correct.... call it what it is.... killing the deer !

Bridget Gulka

I am not nor will I ever be a hunter. That said I do understand that it is necessary ... that is what hunting season is for. If you hunt you should eat it not stick those poor animals heads on a wall like a trophy. That is disgusting to me. They can now dolor coat it anyway they want but the truth is it started with a select few complaining about the deer eating the flowers and shrubs.... so it is about how inconvenient the deer have become to yard snobs. Do not be surprised if there is not a major protest if this comes to pass.

Mary Whitmire

I am in total agreement with you. Our community has already started a deer culling program. I wrote letters with links suggesting alternative methods that other golf communities have implemented and found successful. It appears there is nothing I can do at this point. In my neighborhood I haven't heard the words "tic born illness" or any concerns about deer related accidents. What was the complaint? FLOWERS and SHRUBS! Honestly? We are willing to take the life of an animal needlessly for the purpose of saving your d*mn flower that will be out of bloom in a couple weeks? Here's the link I sent to our PPOA: http://www.humanesociety.org/news/magazines/2014/05-06/out-of-season-alternatives-to-deer-culls.html

Joe Mo

I prefer the contraceptive method, let John Strickland place condoms on all the bucks within the city limits, that will be about as effective as culling!

The Deadly Deer Killing Taskforce Commander Michael Black just wants to have fun with his friends at the taxpayers expense. Next up him and his buddies will want to kill all those deadly and dangerous squirrels.

Also to note the group that wants to kill animals around your pets and family home only has a 20% recovery rate. That's right they will do more to feed the coyotes and increase their population with all the dead deer they can't ever find after shooting.

Again I ask Mr. Black of the Commander of the Deadly Deer Killing Taskforce why not tackle a real issue like coyotes, rather than herbivores like deer?

Oh and may the Gods of Irony help Mr. Black see the error of his ways. Hopefully he never gets shot like what he enjoys doing to those deer. Keep your orange on Commander Black.

Mike McLellan

"Task force Chairman" John Strickland, who is also a council member states... "I have come to the conclusion the village needs to manage the herd. I don't see how the village could avoid considering this." ............Everybody knows this was your conclusion from day #1. Now the village tax payers pay $1000 dollars a day for some outsiders with techy night gear to come in and have some fun. You could easily find professional hunters from Moore County to satisfy your 'conclusion' and they would pay The Village to partake. Just run it in your classified and listen to your phone ring off the hook..

Tommy Davis

There is a methodology that will work to solve the deer issues and it doesn't involve slaughtering defenseless animals. It's a matter of getting deer to do what you want them to do. Simple solution.

Mary Whitmire

Thank you!

Debbie Cruse

Unbelievable! People move into areas where the deer have always been. They grow plants in their yards that attract deer and then whine because the deer are eating their plants. I see no reason to KILL animals just because a “select few” complain. If they want their homes to be “animal free” perhaps they should consider moving out of the deer’s territory. Who will be next??? The pesky squirrels who bury their nuts, pansy eating bunnies, Eagles that may “poop” in their yard? Really folks!

Mary Whitmire

We also have a huge pet overpopulation in this county…would the council propose a cull of them as well? "He does not have an agenda," she said. "He has a job to do. He is a hunter, but he is also an animal lover" I don't know what kind of hunter Medford is, but the hunters I've seen consider it a sport. Sorry, but you can't say you love animals then proceed to shoot them, hang them on your wall and pose with their dead bodies with your EGO and say you love animals. It's an oxymoron! What animals specifically does he love? It certainly isn't deer. There are other alternatives that should be discussed. ."http://www.humanesociety.org/news/magazines/2014/05-06/out-of-season-alternatives-to-deer-culls.html

Unbelievable, ridiculous waste of time. This "Task Force" never should have happened. There never was a big "problem". OK all those pesky squirrels who can't make up their minds and stop in the middle of the road are next to be eliminated by "sharp shooters".

Brenda Burt

What is wrong with you people? Stop planting flowers that attract deers? And stop feeding them!

J Taylor

I hope other towns in this county don't start these idiotic "task forces." It's just stupid and a waste of time and money.

Bridget Gulka

This is totally unacceptable !

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