Judicial Candidates

Top: Steve Bibey, left, Regina Joe and Gregory Thompson. Bottom: Michael Stone, left, Warren McSweeney and Brian Godfrey.(Courtesy photographs)

Five candidates are vying for gavels in the Judicial District 19D, which includes Moore and Hoke counties.

The new judicial district has been allotted two Superior Court judges instead of one. Candidates facing off for the new seat are Michael Stone and Gregory Thompson.

The three candidates running for District Court include Brian Godfrey, Steve Bibey and Regina M. Joe.

Following are brief summaries of each candidate's background, along with their scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey released last week by the North Carolina Bar Association. Nearly 3,500 attorneys participated in the survey, which the association says is designed to assess “the legal ability, integrity, and professionalism of judges and judicial candidates.” 

Michael Stone, a Republican, currently presides over a judicial district that spans Scotland, Hoke, Richmond and Anson counties. He was appointed to the seat in 2014 by former Gov. Pat McCrory before winning election in 2016.

Stone's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey

Stone's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

Gregory Thompson, a Democrat, is a trial lawyer with more than 25 years of experience. The top vote-getter will serve alongside Superior Court Judge James Webb, whose term runs through 2024.

Thompson's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey.

Thompson's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

Brian Godfrey, a Whispering Pines resident who serves as the attorney for the Lee County Department of Social Services, is competing against two sitting judges in the District Court race.

Godfrey, a Republican, is a native of the Sandhills. He graduated from Union Pines High School and previously served as an assistant attorney for Moore County.

Godfrey's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey

Godfrey's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

Steve Bibey is an Air Force veteran and former law enforcement officer. After stints with the Southern Pines Police Department and Moore County Sheriff’s Office, he began practicing law as a trial lawyer in Carthage.

Bibey, a Republican, currently presides over court in a district that encompasses Montgomery, Moore and Randolph counties. He won the office after defeating incumbent Judge William H. Heafner in the 2014 election.

Bibey's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey

Bibey's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

Regina M. Joe, a Charlotte native, began her legal career in 1989 as an assistant district attorney in Greenville. In 2005, Joe made history as the first black woman to serve as chief public defender in North Carolina.

She currently presides over cases in Judicial District 16A, which includes Scotland and Hoke counties. Joe, a Democrat, became the first black person and first woman to be elected to that judicial district in 2006.

Joe's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey

Joe's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

Also appearing on the ballot is Warren McSweeney, a Republican who is up for an uncontested District Court seat. McSweeney lives in West End and serves as an assistant district attorney for the county.

McSweeney's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey

McSweeney's scores from the Judicial Performance Evaluation survey. (Image courtesy NC Bar Association)

One-stop voting began Wednesday and runs until Nov. 3 in Moore County. Ballots can be cast at the Moore County Board of Elections Office in Carthage and at the Douglass Community Center in Southern Pines.

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Comments that violate any of the rules above are subject to removal by staff.

Thank you for reading!

Please purchase a subscription to continue reading. Subscribe today and support local community journalism.

Digital Only Subscriptions

The Pilot

Get unlimited digital access and support award-winning local journalism, for just $5 a month. This includes access to the electronic replica edition of The Pilot.

Starting at
$5.35 for 30 days

Already have a Print Subscription? Get Digital Access Free.

The Pilot

As a print subscriber, you also have unlimited digital access. Connect your account now. Or, call customer service at 910-693-2487 for help.

 

Our system has been updated, if you are a current print subscriber and cannot obtain your unlimited access, please contact customer support 910-693-2490. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Home Delivery

The Pilot

Our best deal: Get all the news of Moore County delivered to your home each Wednesday and Sunday — and receive unlimited digital access to thepilot.com.

Starting at
$27.82 for 90 days