The Malcolm Blue Historical Society is celebrating its fortieth Anniversary. Recently the members and guests of the Society came to a reception honoring its past presidents, whose visions helped make the Farm a reality.

Martha Clayton Swaringen, founder and first Malcolm Blue president, presented 40th anniversary plaques to past presidents in attendance. Those receiving recognition were: H. Eugene Maples, Paul Brill, Pam Dannelley and Bob Martin. Rep. Jamie Boles was recognized as the first president of the Malcolm Blue Junior Historians, which was formed in 1976.

Those receiving President plaques posthumously were Eleanor Seawell, whose husband, Arnold, received the award on her behalf; C. Coolidge Thompson, whose daughter, Susan Adams, accepted for him; and Claudia Blair, who was co-founder of the Malcolm Blue Historical Crafts & Farm Skills Festival, the Malcolm Blue Junior Historians and the Clayton-Blair Museum, received a special recognition plaque accepted by her daughter Malene Blair, who was also one of the first Junior Historians.

Lee Clayton, vice president of the first Junior Historians, made a surprise presentation of a special plaque to her mother, Martha Clayton Swaringen, honoring her 40 years of leadership and community service to generations of children in the Sandhills.

Ellen Marcus, the current president, spoke to the group and invited them to upcoming events. Marcus also prepared and served the hors d’eouvres and desserts at the reception.

A special feature was the unveiling of the Glen Rounds Exhibit, sponsored by Boles Funeral Home. The exhibit depicts Rounds’ life from the Badlands of South Dakota to art school in Missouri and on to New York City during the Depression, where he took art lessons from Thomas Hart Benton along with fellow student, Jackson Pollock.

During one summer, Rounds took a road trip with Benton and Pollock to show them the Great American West. Next for him was the U.S. Army, life in Pinebluff, Southern Pines and finally, time at The Malcolm Blue Farm.

During 1966, Rounds made an art studio out of a deserted and overgrown farm on Bethesda Road in Aberdeen. He observed and studied wildlife on the 1825 Farmstead. “Snake Tree” was one of the hundreds of his books and illustrations. “Snake Tree” relates to his experience at the farm.

The Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum are available for special events such as club meetings, family reunions, company picnics and even weddings. Tours of the Homestead and Museum are also available for children, adults and groups.

For more information and reservations contact Ellen Marcus at (910) 603-2739 or Martha Swaringen at (910) 944-7685.

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